Political cartoons bondage-NC bail bondage | NC Policy Watch

This weekly diary takes a look at the past week's important news stories from the perspective of our leading editorial cartoonists including a few foreign ones with analysis and commentary added in by me. Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons. Final Update : The complete diary is now posted. This weekly diary has outgrown the present version of Daily Kos!!! Sometimes I wonder if the Republican Party and its wingnut factions exists solely for the purpose of keeping editorial cartoonists gainfully employed around the country.

Political cartoons bondage

Political cartoons bondage

Next caller! Print This Article. This could not be truer than in the world of modern British politics. David Cohen, Asheville Citizen Times. Another Tennessee Political cartoons bondage extols the virtues of Charlie Daniel. They always tell us that they will clear up the mess caused by the last lot. Please let us know. Les Invisible Hands.

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Name: Name of the artist you're looking for. Subject: Subject matter of artwork. Year: The year artwork was published. This could not be truer than in the world of modern British politics. Over the years our political leaders, one after another, have promised us a brighter future whilst, in reality, the economy has lurched from one crisis to the next.

With minor alterations to dates and Prime Ministers, this visual metaphor could easily have been drawn today. Our political leaders have always promised us better times and a brighter future in their attempts to either obtain or retain office. They always tell us that they will clear up the mess caused by the last lot. On the rare occasion that a Prime Minister miraculously appears to repair the damage caused by his predecessor, there is undoubtedly a price to pay in the long term. For example, the last Labour Government presided over an unprecedented ten years of economic prosperity, but through this period the seeds were sown for the beginning of one of the worst recessions to hit this country since the s.

Despite assurances from every Prime Minister that things can only get better, there remains a constant credibility gap between what they say and what they achieve.

Just look at the post-war record of our political leaders' meaningless utterances. In , Labour's first majority government offered a new Jerusalem, but left office six years later with rationing still in place and the economy faltering?

Does that sound familiar? When the Conservatives returned to office in on the slogan 'set the people free', they did nothing of the sort. They appeased the Unions and made no attempt to privatise nationalised industries or dismantle the welfare state.

In the s, Harold Wilson said that under a Labour government, a new Britain would be forged by the white heat of technological revolution. John Major came to office in saying that he wanted a country at ease with itself. The problem was his party was not at ease with itself and this led to its disastrous showing at the General Election. Gordon Brown told the House of Commons that he had brought an end to Boom and Bust, and finally our present Prime Minister, David Cameron, has continued in this vein of political faux pas, claiming that he and his fellow Etonian Cabinet Ministers, together with the general public, "are all in it together.

As we can see in this collection, the standard and quality of cartooning in Britain remains as strong and as vibrant as ever.

Thanks to the cartoonists we can at least find some humour and understanding of the mess and pain the politicians seem to put us through so regularly. Until the early s, it was only the tabloid press that carried political cartoons, because the broadsheets considered them too frivolous an item for a serious newspaper. The exception was the Manchester Guardian, which syndicated David Low's cartoons from the Evening Standard from the s onwards.

In fact, Low was the first cartoonist to be employed by a broadsheet when he left the Evening Standard for the Manchester Guardian in Today every broadsheet employs a leading political cartoonist and gives them the space for their cartoon only tabloid cartoonists can now dream of.

How things have changed. Until the s, just about every tabloid and London evening newspaper employed a political cartoonist of substance. Now the Mirror no longer carries a political cartoon and it is ten years since the only London evening paper left in existence published one.

Their cartoons are topical gag-orientated around the news of the day. These are primarily designed to put a smile on the faces of their respective readers. But they are probably all time-strapped and somewhat uninterested in the arcane doings of Westminster and other seats of power. They probably bought the paper for a quick light-hearted pick-me-up involving sports stars or celebs.

Those working at the broadsheets tend to be given a completely free hand and problems that arise with editors are invariably over questions of taste rather than content. They feel that doing so lessens the chance of any editorial interference. Rowson admits that he and Bell are lucky at the Guardian because, in his words, "We get a free hand, basically. I tend to outline my intentions in case there is an obvious clash with the column below.

Generally, we operate on a kind of internal self? Here they not only enjoy the buzz of the newsroom, but also find attending the daily editorial news conferences helpful for choosing the subject matter for their cartoons. It goes against my nature to want to bolster anyone. You cringe from that sort of thing. In contrast, they are expected to conform to varying degrees of daily editorial input and control. According to Andy Davey: "Unlike the brave cartoonist-knights of the broadsheets, speaking truth to power with their trusty, unyielding Pens of Satire, the tabloid cartoonist must cut his cartoon to suit his guvnor.

He is not allowed the indulgence of adopting the mantle of the Principled Artist, as in the broadsheets. He is a hack and must learn that pretty quick. Occasionally, the editor will make a suggestion if he does not like any of those proposed. Sometimes, the editor's decision is not made until later in the day, which has ramifications for the cartoonist. They seem to enjoy the macho brinkmanship of the late decision, just bringing the ship round in time.

Our political leaders appear to be getting younger and younger, which makes caricature harder, as prominent features tend to develop as people age. Nonetheless, cartoonists are having great fun with the likes of Cameron, Miliband, Clegg and Osborne.

It's so shiny and rosy and posh. His forehead is so waxy there's a permanent starburst off it. And his forehead is huge; really bulbous and not helped by a very high hairline. He has permanently flushed cheeks. He has goggly frogeyes with bags under them and crow's feet to the sides, a little pointy nose and a tiny lipless mouth.

I think he's probably heavier in real life than he looks, so I give him chubby jowls. Bell says he got the idea after noticing how remarkably smooth and even taut Cameron's skin was, as if his head had been encased in tight rubber. There was some initial opposition from Bell's editor at the Guardian, Alan Rusbridger, who forbade him to depict him in this way. However, Rusbridger gave Bell the green light when he found that the papers' advertisers did not have a problem with it.

Cameron has certainly been irked by Bell's depiction of him, as he recently told the cartoonist in person that "You can only push the condom so far! Rowson has had great success by depicting him as Little Lord Fauntleroy, whilst Brookes constantly associates him with his Public school education at Eton and at Oxford.

Ed Miliband's geekiness, dark set eyes and nasal utterances are a gift to the them. Because of his eyes, both Christian Adams and Steve Bell have drawn him at times as a panda bear.

Bell, in particular, has focused all his energies on Miliband's eyes: "I've drawn Ed a few times and he has crazy, staring eyeballs. His brother David has similar eyes but nowhere near as dramatic. This is because, like Wallace, Miliband also appears hapless, making the public's perception of him unsuitable Prime Ministerial material. The cartoonists portray the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, as a sinister figure, along with his prominent 'bum' nose.

Christian Adams sees Osborne as: "…the pantomime villain straight from central casting. That grey bloodless skin. Those dark eyes I even add some blue to the flesh colour , that sneering sideways mouth, his dark hair, which I make jet black and greasy, and best of all, his wonderful nose.

I got a letter from a reader outraged that I give him a "penile, testicular nose" and I thought, good!

I've seen him in real life and he's actually very unremarkable, so thank goodness he photographs like this. This, I imagine, is a reference to Osborne's earlier friendship with Natalie Rowe, a dominatrix who called herself Miss Whiplash. According to Rowe, Osborne was fascinated by her world of whips, chains and rubber bondage equipment.

According to Bell, "The whole point about George's stance is its about restraint, restraint, restraint, cuts, cuts, whips, whips, straps, straps, chains, chains. Christian Adams believes this is because "he does actually look like a cardigan catalogue male model. There are no salient features you can grab and hang on to. There's a look about him — not vacant, but distant. Nothing much you could put your finger on, but you make that into a feature.

He's got a very high forehead and a very pronounced bum chin. Beyond that, it's hard to get a handle on him. Despite being Deputy Prime Minister and Leader of the Liberal Democrats, the perception is that he has no power or authority and is a prisoner of the Tories.

This is the way Peter Brookes depicts him, in the guise of Cameron's Etonian fag and lackey 'Cleggers'. So the idea of Cameron as a prefect and Clegg as his fag seemed a theme that is infinitely playable. I've called him 'Cleggers' because it's a public-school way of addressing somebody.

The Lib Dems are a party to the left of Labour and they are doing the Tories' bidding — they are fig leaves, being used to justify Tory policy. You can tell he's uncomfortable, as you would be if you were having all this stuff heaped upon you by the Tories. The whole thing is riddled with these wonderful, strange anomalies that will never be resolved, which is why the Coalition is so good for cartoonists.

According to Riddell: "The reason Clegg is such a gift to draw is certainly not to do with his physical appearance; he's a pretty ordinary-looking bloke. He doesn't have glasses, doesn't have a beard, he's not balding But his political position makes him an absolute gift, because of his status in this Coalition. So week after week, we do Clegg as a lapdog, a ventriloquist's dummy. Metaphorically, he's much smaller than Cameron, so we'll have him sitting on his knee and being a little person.

We did the same with Hague; made him a very small figure, even though he's quite tall. And, to top it all, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne popped up and informed us that we have 'turned the corner' as depicted in Steve Bell's cartoon. You could not make it up! I wonder if someone picking up this book in ten years time, when we will have a new generation of politicians in charge, will think, "Not much has changed has it? Toggle left Slidebar View Account x.

What future is there for political cartooning?

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Political cartoons bondage

Political cartoons bondage.

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It’s Not All Doom for Political Cartoonists The Daily Cartoonist

This weekly diary takes a look at the past week's important news stories from the perspective of our leading editorial cartoonists including a few foreign ones with analysis and commentary added in by me. Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons. Final Update : The complete diary is now posted. This weekly diary has outgrown the present version of Daily Kos!!!

Sometimes I wonder if the Republican Party and its wingnut factions exists solely for the purpose of keeping editorial cartoonists gainfully employed around the country. It was certainly the case these past few days as the crazies were out in full force.

In an effort to please some of its donors, it was revealed that the Republican National Committee had recently scheduled a trip to a bondage club in West Hollywood, California, one which features dancers in bondage gear and stimulating acts of a sexual nature.

He said, it's tough being black. If the GOP hadn't taken a holier-than-thou political attitude all these past decades and pretended to represent "Family Values," they might have been spared the mockery and ridicule. Nothing elicits a stronger response from cartoonists than hypocritical political behavior and the result was some of the funniest cartoons in recent months. So was the case with the arrest of several members of the Hutaree Militia based in Adrian, Michigan.

Their behavior and attitudes were compared by many cartoonists to terrorist groups like Al-Qaeda. As Eugene Robinson wrote in his column in the Washington Post.

The arrests of members of a Michigan-based "Christian" militia group should convince doubters that there is good reason to worry about right-wing, anti-government extremism -- and potential violence -- in the Age of Obama. I put the word Christian in quotes because anyone who plots to assassinate law enforcement officers, as a federal indictment alleges members of the Hutaree militia did, is no follower of Christ.

According to federal prosecutors, the Hutaree -- the word's not in my dictionary, but its Web site claims it means "Christian warrior" -- are convinced that their enemies include "state and local law enforcement, who are deemed 'foot soldiers' of the federal government, federal law enforcement agencies and employees, participants in the 'New World Order,' and anyone who does not share in the Hutaree's beliefs.

The controversy at hand isn't over disagreement between differing interpretations of some aspect of church theology and religious doctrine but, rather, involves innocent, young lives that may be dramatically altered by the unethical and criminal actions of some members of the clergy.

I've shared many of the unusually large number of cartoons including ones by several foreign cartoonists detailing this abusive practice and strong condemnation by cartoonists all over the world. I could have as easily included twice or, even, thrice the number of cartoons than I did on this explosive issue. The Church -- and Pope Benedict -- were portrayed as being hopelessly out of touch with today's standards of decency and morality.

Whether such criticism will result in any long-term policy changes within the church remains to be seen. It is obvious to anyone even marginally interested in organized religion that the Catholic Church needs to adapt to changing times. Otherwise, decay from within will continue to undermine its credibility and moral authority. President Barack Obama made no new friends this past week as he allowed for offshore drilling for both oil and gas.

Editorial Cartoonist Rob Rogers of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette succinctly summed up the political ramifications of this policy decision. Bob Rogers, Comics.

He did what?! Obama sounded a lot like Sarah Palin when he announced his plan for offshore drilling. I don't get it. He isn't going to convince Republicans not to hate him. All he is doing is making sure environmentalists hate him too. Hope you like this week's selection of editorial cartoons.

Do indicate in your comments as which ones you liked the best and why. Your feedback is important to me and allows me to continue to tinker with this diary's content and format. Lowe evaluates the hypocritical behavior of the 'Family Values Party' and one that attempts to hold itself to higher moral standards than the rest of us mortal beings.

Many decades ago, when I was growing up in LA, the West Hollywood area was already developing a reputation for being gay-friendly, and that was before being openly gay was even cool. Mike Luckovich, Comics. Blame the Republicans? Jen Sorensen, Slowpoke , Buy this cartoon. Sorensen looks at the emerging GOP strategy to win the hearts and minds of the American people and make substantial gains in the November Elections.

It's guaranteed as much success as winning over the Taliban in Afghanistan. You heard it here first! Remember the "Dean Scream," the celebratory whoop that ended Howard Dean's presidential ambitions?

Does that not seem like nothing compared to the vein-popping whackadoodlery coming out of Republican congressmen? And yet somehow, their careers do not end. My response is that Photoshop unfortunately doesn't come with fluorescent colors.

I think we should just start calling him John the Orange, or simply His Orangeness. David Cohen, Asheville Citizen Times. Clay Bennett, Comics. Matt Wuerker, Politico. Jerry Holbert, Boston Herald , Buy this cartoon.

Paul Szep, Comics. Garry Trudeau, Doonesbury. Jeff Tahler, Comics. Reacting to this cartoon by Horsey, a reader writes. The Death Panel lady who relies on govt. Repeating stories that have been demonstrated to be untrue. Demonstrating against tax increases when they each received a tax cut. Wanting to "take our country back! Pat Oliphant, Universal Press Syndicate. Mike Thompson, Comics. Just over one year ago, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano was under fire for a report issued by her agency that warned of the risk posed by right-wing extremist groups in America.

The report was intended to "provide situational awareness to state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies on the phenomenon and trends of violent radicalization in the United States" Napolitano explained in a press release. At the time, conservatives skewered Napolitano. Rush Limbaugh denounced the report as "a genuine hit job.

It makes you shudder to think how bad things will be next year at this time. John Sherffius, Comics. Ben Sargent, Universal Press Syndicate. Rogers tries to make sense of this madness and equates the behavior of militias to Al-Qaeda. He may have stumbled onto the truth. It is getting rough out there. Not only do we have to worry about al-Qaida terrorists, now we have to worry about our own citizens attacking us or our police forces.

These heavily armed right-wing extremist "Christian" militias are not following the teachings of Jesus. Stuart Carlson, Universal Press Syndicate. Tony Auth, Philadelphia Inquirer. Joel Pett, Lexington Herald-Leader. Ed Stein, Comics. Stein wonders what's in the water for every time the country experiences an economic downturn , wingnuts can predictably be counted upon to display bizarre behavior.

Why don't the rest of us do the same? What is it about bad economies that brings out the crazies? We have the Tea Party zealots who stand for standing against everything, home-grown Christian militias indistinguishable in rhetoric from the Taliban, except for the religion, and the paranoid anti-census loonies who think that counting people is a government plot.

This should please the anti-tax, anti-government crowd, at least in the states that lose both tax revenues and government representation. The real oddity of all this anti-government foment is that it was the failure of government to perform its regulatory job that played an enormous part in the economic meltdown. Counterproductive by Nick Anderson, Comics. Rogers, the editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette , feels the pain of Teabaggers.

We live in a very divided country. I wish the Census form had questions about people's politics as well as their ethnicity. I just think it would be interesting to see how people label themselves. I would label myself as Cartoonian-American. Acknowledging that he inherited the problem of pedophilia within the Catholic Church, Stein is very fair to Pope Benedict but wonders if any substantive steps have been taken by the Pope to deal with problems of the past.

The crimes require justice be done and not have the church's hierarchy including the Pope drag it heels and sweep such problems under the rug. In some ways, this one was too easy.

A pedophile priest, allowed for years to molest boys at a school for the deaf while his superiors, including then Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict, turned a deaf ear to complaints. Ratzinger in was charged with the task of dealing with the unfolding pedophile priest scandal, and by all accounts he had a profound conversion when he finally saw how serious the problem was.

What remains to be seen is how the Church deals with its own leaders who ignored or covered up the scandals. So far, there has been a great deal of forgiveness but very little punishment for those who looked the other way while the men under their authority committed such despicable acts. How will the Pope who now recognizes the severity of the problem deal with the Cardinal who allowed the problem to fester, when they are the same man?

Mike Scott, NewJerseyNewsroom. Is this Christian-like behavior, he asks?

Political cartoons bondage

Political cartoons bondage

Political cartoons bondage