Non-fans of dick hill-Dick Hill | The Guilded Earlobe

Compound Fractures by Stephen White Dr. Alan Gregory, Bk. Quick Thoughts: Compound Fractures is an appropriate ending to this untraditional thriller series. A highly emotional and complex read that hovers between engrossing and frustrating, Compound Fractures is a fitting cap to this long time series. This week seems to be all about finales for me.

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Glad you enjoyed it. Also, I really Non-fans of dick hill how Alan Gregory is a far cry from your typical thriller Non-fans of dick hill. Not everyone is happy, though. There are no end to the improbable characters he creates, but Europe teen girls particularly enjoyed the band, "Johnny and the Contusions " and their revenge song protocol. He even has the elderly stammer that's classic to Alzheimers. When I hear Dick Hill talk, I picture an old guy on a walker, not an action hero.

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Dave Barry has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for commentary. His columns for the Miami Herald were syndicated worldwide, and he is the author of a number of bestselling books, including the recently published Peter and the Starcatchers with Ridley Pearson.

He lives in Miami, where he drives very nervously. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Discover Prime Book Box for Kids. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Big Trouble. Dave Barry. Insane City. The Worst Class Trip Ever. Dave Barry's Book of Bad Songs. What other items do customers buy after viewing this item? Start reading Tricky Business on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Customer reviews. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. I didn't expect to enjoy this book as much as I did. I knew Barry could be hilarious in his essays, but I had never read any of his fiction.

I picked the book to fill a square in the Bingo game run every summer by Books on the Nightstand. I needed an author born in the same year I was. I'm running out of time, so I picked the Barry book because it was short and cheap. I discovered that it is also very, very funny. I actually laughed out loud a couple of times. Apparently Barry's humor skills translate very well into fiction.

In a riff on the Ship-of-Fools trope, a gambling ship takes on an assortment of quirky characters, including drug smugglers, burned-out cover band members, senile citizens, an undercover cop, a costumed mascot, and assorted zombie slot-machine slaves.

Chaos and hilarity ensue. A fun summer read that puts me one square closer to my ambition of completing a blackout card. Four books to go before the Labor Day cutoff. One person found this helpful. I particularly appreciate his use of the Epilogue to wrap up loose ends. There are no end to the improbable characters he creates, but I particularly enjoyed the band, "Johnny and the Contusions " and their revenge song protocol. Once again I found myself laughing out loud, which proved problematic since I read in bed while my wife tries to sleep!

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase. In his second novel, Dave Barry has taken his readers out to sea for a fast-paced action yarn that is as funny as it is exciting. On the day this story takes place all in one day -- difficult to do and keep it exciting, but Barry does it , the ship is going out into Tropical Storm Hector, despite all safety warnings to the contrary, because of a shipment of drugs and cash too big to let go.

The characters include a musician with a crush on a cocktail waitress, a pair of old men who just want out of their retirement home, a captain who wanted to give up a life of crime, a man in a giant pink conch costume, some stupid criminals, some smart criminals and the crew of a TV news station that suffer a freak chain of events I suspect many of us here on the Gulf Coast secretly wish would happen to REAL news anchors when they start scaremongering and stupid reporting whenever a storm hits.

Fans of Dave Barry, the funniest columnist in America, are probably lining up for this book already, but fans of a good action comedy will enjoy it too. Still a good read but you could not share this one with your teenagers. It actually feels like a little Stephen King snuck in in places. I'm a big Dave Barry fan. I rarely miss his weekly column, and have read many of his "non-fiction" books prior to his first novel, "Big Trouble", which I thoroughly enjoyed.

So it was with great anticipation that I looked forward to the release of Tricky Business. I was only mildly disappointed. While has Barry succeeded in pulling off this slight divergence from his usual course, it comes at some expense to trademark wry wit and insightful observations of the dumb things people do.

As in much of Barry's work, southern Florida richy justified bears the brunt of his light sarcasm. And the cast of characters, while memorable, is not up to par with the zany misfits and malcontents from Big Trouble. While "Business" will evoke many chuckles, I didn't find myself laughing out loud as I usually do when reading Dave Barry. In the final analysis, though, this is a darkly humorous book that is worth the time and money.

Longtime Barry fans will find enough of the master to hold interest, while the uninitiated may find Tricky Business has an acceptable alternative to Carl Hiaasen. This is not the best book that Dave Barry has written. I laughed until I hurt. Just a cute story told in a very Dave Barry manner. I wonder where that deflated Zodiac ended up. Format: Audio Cassette Verified Purchase. Unabridged audio. They will all be passengers or hired help on a casino boat that will float about three miles off the coast of Florida.

As usual there is a wide assortment of characters. There are a couple old folks who escaped a retirement home, a band called 'Johnny and the Contusions' whose main goal is to be high, drug runners, cocktail waitress's and a few others. All play a major role in this laugh out loud story. The reader, Dick Hill, is a very talented voice actor. From his mobster voice to his old man voice, the inflections put forth are truly hilarious. See all customer reviews.

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I'm not going to get worked up regardless of who wins. Robert De Niro and Robby Benson. Also no. Which shows are as popular as Cheers or Seinfeld or Friends? Drew Magary.

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Valley of Silence Audiobook | Nora Roberts | 804case.com

Compound Fractures by Stephen White Dr. Alan Gregory, Bk. Quick Thoughts: Compound Fractures is an appropriate ending to this untraditional thriller series. A highly emotional and complex read that hovers between engrossing and frustrating, Compound Fractures is a fitting cap to this long time series. This week seems to be all about finales for me.

With just finishing the Breaking Bad and Luther finales, it seems fitting that I would be listening to the final book in a 20 book series. I wish I could say that I was there from the very beginning when the first Alan Gregory novel, Privileged Information was first released back in In fact, I am a newish fan of Stephen White, and this is one of the few long time mystery thriller series that I have experienced entirely in audio.

While the majority of this series has been narrated by Dick Hill, some of the earlier novels featured some well know narrators like Scott Brick and Michael Kramer. One of the things I really enjoyed about this series is, unlike many ongoing series, White took a lot of risks with his format, shifting perspectives, having novels told from the perspective of Dr.

Also, I really liked how Alan Gregory is a far cry from your typical thriller hero. In many ways he is the anti-thriller hero. Somewhat meek, often bullied, sexually repressed, yet with an ability to look at things from different perspectives. Alan Gregory made lots of mistakes along the way. I was impressed with Stephen Whites decision to wrap up this series. There is a scene about two thirds of the way through Compound Fractures where the two main characters of the novel, Dr.

Gregory and his best friend, Boulder Police Detective Sam Purdy, both basically admit that they are acting like douches towards each other. This is when I let out my biggest sigh of the novel because honestly, they were and it was starting to get to me a bit.

Compound Fractures is not an easy read for fans of this series. The backbone of this series has been the relationship between these two friends, and how that relationship is fractured, lacking in trust.

As a reader I found this quite frustrating. Throughout this whole series I have always liked Alan Gregory, even when he was whiney and annoying, I had some level of respect for him. This is both the beauty and problem with Compound Fractures. White has created a brilliant plot where the lies and mistrust have just become too much for these two men. The theme of this novel was trust yet, there was also an interesting exploration of how much Sam has changed, much for the better, while Alan seemed to change somewhat for the worse.

With what they know about each other and the potential for either of them to find themselves dealing with the consequences of their actions, how much could they trust each other? White does a wonderful job setting up this conundrum over the course of a few books.

As a reader I wanted to scream at both of these men. I wanted them to just talk to the other, to hash out their problems and become the Alan and Sam of old. What Stephen White does here in Compound Fractures is impressive. He takes everything you think you know about the series, and about the events leading up to the tragic ending of Line of Fire, and twist it and turn it to a point where you realize everything you thought you knew was wrong.

I never felt comfortable in this book, but in a good way. There was so much pain, so much suffering, and some much mistrust that every step along the way felt like you were negotiating a mine field. White managed to incorporate a lot of subplots from the series into this finale in surprising ways. Much of this novel is Alan coming to terms with his complicated feelings for her, and discovering some of her darkest secrets.

Its heart wrenching and painful stuff and the perfect cap to this aspect of the series. Compound Fractures will not in anyway work as a standalone. While there are some traditional thriller aspects of this novel, with a murder investigation, potential criminal jeopardy and other little twists along this way, this is not really a thriller novel. Compound Fractures is about dealing with the emotional, legal and personal fallout of the past 19 novels.

This is a novel written for the fans of the series who were there along the way. Yet, one thing that White did confused me. There is one subplot in this novel that is very much left open ended.

That life can never truly episodic. This hanging particle served as a reminder that, until death, there is no true ending to the subplots of a life. As a person I can respect this.

Yet, instead, what you get is a sort of gray ending, knowing that life goes on and the mistakes of these characters past still have a way to haunt them. While frustrating, I found it utterly appropriate. I have listened to a lot of Dick Hill narrations over my time. Hill, in many ways, reminds me of those great character actors that you recognize every time they show up in a guest role on one of your favorite TV shows. You know what you are going to get, but you still look forward to getting it.

Overall, I think Hill does a fine job with this series. There is a lot of emotion in this book. I think that Hill himself felt that this book was special, and deserved a special performance, and that is what he gave.

I think many will love it, while others will be let down. Yet, for me, I thought it was an appropriate ending for this untraditional series, made special by an excellent performance by the narrator.

Never Go Back is classic Jack Reacher, full of conspiracy, quick sudden violence, an idiosyncratic investigatory process and some surprising moments of heart. A few years ago ahem, like maybe 15 or so a coworker explained to me why he enjoyed the television show, Walker: Texas Ranger. Now, before this, I was a bit skeptical of the appeal of this show, and while I never became a fan, after this conversation I begun to understand why this show could garnish a solid fan base.

My coworker explained that someone usually got their assed kicked in the first five minutes and last five minutes of every episode. Thinking about this, I found the formula to be pretty much solid. This is not a criticism in the least bit. I personally enjoy a action for action sake book, movie or TV show on occasion, as long as the show gives me plenty of what I am looking for, I am happy.

Yet, when he shows up, he finds things amiss. Yet, when Reacher discovers that Major Turner is in fact arrested, and some local soldiers attempt to intimidate him into running, he does what his current batch of enemies least want him to do, he sticks around stirring up trouble.

Never Goes Back starts off with a bang, sucking me right into this latest tale with a wonderful set up, some over the top Reacher moments, and a complex conspiracy that only a person willing to do exactly what is least expected can crack open. Reacher, of course, is exactly this type of person. As always, the scenarios flirts with the edges of unbelievably and Reacher is either the luckiest bastard in the world, or just really THAT good.

The pacing of this tale was a bit off balanced. It started out pretty explosive, and the first 5 hours are non-stop awesome, but there is a long stretch in the middle that is interesting, but drags a bit. Also, I felt the ending was a bit anticlimactic, without the big payoff in both revelation and violent confrontation that you want in a Reacher novel.

I think this has to do with the fact that his powerful enemies, with seemingly unlimited resources were not much of a match in the end for a man with good walking boots and a toothbrush. Overall, I loved Never Go Back. Dick Hill is back in his classic Reacher form, bringing his meticulous, should I even say, pedantic wording, and sudden violent outburst alive for all us to revel in.

Listening to Dick Hill read a Jack Reacher novel is, for audiobook fans, like returning home, even if your home is walking down the long stretches of American Highways and byways. This time there are no awkward train related sex scenes, or nasal issues, just Reacher and enough interesting peripheral characters for Hill to sink his larynx into.

As always, the bit of melancholy at the ending of the tale leaves just enough for me to long for the next Reacher novel the moment I complete the current one. Who knows what is next for out lone hero? The Books of Blood is a strong collection of horror takes that should, at times, make you laugh while inserting nightmarish visions into your brain to disturb your nights.

Before this moment, I had very little control over the books I could read. Now, here I was, unsupervised, with my own money, ready to buy my own books. I had read Cujo and Christine before, which were, unbeknownst to my mother, available in my school library, so I knew what I was expecting.

I also picked up a novel by a new to me author named Dean Koontz, The Bad Place, which sent me into a voracious need to read all his books.

The Damnation game scared the hell out of me. I think I may have been too young at the time for that novel. It would be years later before I returned to one of his novels, the Fantasy tale of Imajica, and was blown away buy his writing. The Books of Blood is a short story collection told in a framework of stories written into the skin of a huckster medium when he was brought into investigate strange haunted house.

This first volume had five unique and diverse tales spanning the themes of horror. I have always enjoyed short story collections, although I rarely listen to them in audio. One thing that impressed me with this collection is that for each story, I made an assumption early on in the tale, and each time Barker took the story in ways that surprised me. With the gruesome framework of the series, I was expecting a full on assault of dark and horrific tales and while he delivered on that, he also managed to make me laugh along the way.

My favorite tale of the collection had to be The Yattering and Jack, a story of a battle of wills between a gherkin salesman and the demons assigned to drive him crazy. In Sex, Death and Starshine, a struggling theatre is putting on a production of Twelth Night staring a vapid soap actress. I loved this story. It started out strange to me, but I was instantly thrust into the story through a menagerie of outrageous characters. The Books of Blood is a strong collection of horror takes that should, at times, make you laugh while inserting nightmarish visions into your brain to disturb your nights,.

Audiobook producers tend to take two approaches when casting anthologies, they either hire a single narrator to read all the tales, or they cast each story. Luckily, Crossroads Press took the later approach to casting, bringing in a strong group of narrators, each suited to the tale. Chris Patton started it off with the framework tale.

Despite it being short Patton pulled all the creepiness out of the tale, and slung it right into the faces of the listeners.

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