Convert concentrated to uniform load-Points Loads to Distributed Loads - Structural engineering general discussion - Eng-Tips

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Convert concentrated to uniform load

Convert concentrated to uniform load

Convert concentrated to uniform load

Convert concentrated to uniform load

Convert concentrated to uniform load

Engineering Stack Exchange works best with JavaScript enabled. Beam with uniform loading cnocentrated at 4 corners. The tail is wagging the dog in your scenario. Log in Register. The answer to your question is no.

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We have an engineer in our department who always uses concentratef large uniform Convert concentrated to uniform load load in lieu of concentrated loads from equipment and piping supports. The firm that currently employs me has expanded in the past few years from 15 to 40 employees. Types of Distributed Load Distributed load is further divided into two types. Resources Simulation is an increasingly valuable tool across the product design workflow, but not all simulations are equal. I wold also back check the max shear and moment to make sure there were no problems. RE: Equivalent Uniformly Distributed Loads No response from krus as to why he particularly wants to do this - I'm certainly intersted to know. As shown in the diagram; Trapezoidal Load Trapezoidal load is that which is acting unifrm the span length in Sex meet in burbank washington form of trapezoid. Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden. By simply multiplying the intensity of udl with its loading length. At least if what we're talking about are typical HVAC units. Convert concentrated to uniform load Viewed. Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must be logged in to post a comment.

In this example you can see there are four point loads, located at location 1, 2, 3, and 4.

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  • To calculate 1 , integrate the load function over the length.
  • Point load is that load which acts over a small distance.
  • In this example you can see there are four point loads, located at location 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Point load is that load which acts over a small distance. Because of concentration over small distance this load can may be considered as acting on a point. Distributed load is measured as per unit length. Uniformly distributed load is that whose magnitude remains uniform throughout the length.

Uniformly distributed load is usually represented by W and is pronounced as intensity of udl over the beam, slab etc. Conversion of uniform distributed load to point load is very simple. By simply multiplying the intensity of udl with its loading length. The answer will be the point load which can also be pronounced as Equivalent concentrated load E.

Concentric because converted load will acts at the center of span length. It is that load whose magnitude varies along the loading length with a constant rate. Triangular load is that whose magnitude is zero at one end of span and increases constantly till the 2nd end of the span. As shown in the diagram;. Trapezoidal load is that which is acting on the span length in the form of trapezoid.

Trapezoid is generally form with the combination of uniformly distributed load UDL and triangular load. As shown in the diagram below;. Coupled load is that in which two equal and opposite forces acts on the same span.

The lines of action of both the forces are parallel to each other but opposite in directions. This type of loading creates a couple load. If force on one end of beam acts upward then same force will acts downwards on the opposite end of beam. You must be logged in to post a comment. There are three types of load. These are; Point load that is also called as concentrated load. Distributed load Coupled load Point Load Point load is that load which acts over a small distance.

Types of Distributed Load Distributed load is further divided into two types. Uniformly Distributed Load UDL Uniformly distributed load is that whose magnitude remains uniform throughout the length. Uniformly varying load is further divided into two types ; Triangular Load Trapezoidal Load Triangular Load Triangular load is that whose magnitude is zero at one end of span and increases constantly till the 2nd end of the span. As shown in the diagram; Trapezoidal Load Trapezoidal load is that which is acting on the span length in the form of trapezoid.

As shown in the diagram below; Coupled Load Coupled load is that in which two equal and opposite forces acts on the same span. Coupled load is expressed as kip.

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Imagine a fish tank exactly the same size as the shelf; as you fill it with water, it finds its' own level so the load transmitted to the shelf is uniformly distributed. The load of a bridge is the amount of weight that can be distributed throughout the bridge without collapsing. Join Us! Now if you stood on the plywood with both feet you would be distributing your weight over the entire 1 foot by 1 foot area distributed loading. You must be logged in to post a comment. It seems unfair to make the current owner pay for what someone may do in the future.

Convert concentrated to uniform load

Convert concentrated to uniform load

Convert concentrated to uniform load. Point Load

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Converting Point Loads to Uniform Loads » StruCalc™

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By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail. Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden. Students Click Here. Related Projects. Hi, I am in the offshore oil and gas industry. As we have points loads as data, can someone please advise what is the best way to convert a point load into a distributed load on the deck? Will putting a thick plate at the reaction point help in distributing the point load.

I assume that if the point load is 25 Kips and we put a 12X65 W-Beam, 25" long, then the distributed load will be 25 kips divided by 25x12 sq. Will it practically be a correct way to distribute the load on the steel deck? Regards, SubseaDeep. A What type of deck is it? Steel, wood, concrete? It could have an effect on the answer. The simple answer is that converting a point load to a distributed load to compare it to the "rated" PSF capacity is not a good idea.

It would be unconservative. The deck spans between supports, and needs to be strong enough to support the load between the supports. Then the beams go to columns, columns to foundations B Hire a structural engineer you're going to get that comment anyway, might as well be me :.

A column reaction is a point load and should not be converted to an equivalent distributed load. This is not practical and unrealistic to compare to a rated deck capacity. It's possible that the platform deck may be able to support the 25 kip point load but certainly not the 12 KSF load. I would say you cannot do what you are trying to do. The rating of deck is typically there as an indication for carrying cargo which is spread over an area, not applied locally.

If you are putting something on a deck in terms of local point loading you must do an assessment to the deck capacity specific to the loading you are imposing. For example of you place your column on the deck arbitrarily it may rest on deck plate, above a bulb flat, on a girder or over a bulkhead. The load carrying capacity of a bulkhead is far greater than just 11mm steel plate. So if you just reduce your column load to a UDL how do you know the local capacity of where you are placing it?

I agree with the others here. Just put a steel beam under the point load large enough to carry it. Use the appropriate beam equation in the AISC manual to compute the shears and moments.

Don't try to make the deck do something for which it was not designed. I am assuming that your columns are not going to hit the web of a deck beam. If not, then do like others are saying. Try to add an intercostal beam beneath the deck plate if possible. If hot work is not possible, then add a beam on top of the deck which will span over 2 deck beams.

You can bolt this to the deck. Though you could bolt to the beams below also, if hot work cannot be done, then you can't seal weld around the top flange at the deck plate. At least if it is above the deck, you can see the corrosion when it occurs in the future. Though typically the decks may be rated for psf or something similar, you should check nearby affected beams when actual loads are known.

To the best of your knowledge, check beams with actual loads and apply the rated load in open areas. You said: Quote: I assume that if the point load is 25 Kips and we put a 12X65 W-Beam, 25" long, then the distributed load will be 25 kips divided by 25x12 sq. SubseaDeep, If you meant 25'-0" long x 1'-0" gives you 25 sqft, you are correct, but the beam won't distribute the load evenly. It might carry it to the slab's supporting beams, but it might not. Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a rain dance.

I think we need a sketch to figure out what is going on. I appreciate everybody's help here, and the time you have taken. BAretired, as per your query, I attach a sketch. Is your entire structure resting on deck plate alone, in between the under deck girders, is this plate stiffened? If the deck is stiffened you can put a beam under the columns to spread the load between multiple stiffeners, you need to make sure the beam is stiffer than the deck and so able to spread the load.

If you cannot get the deck plate to work on its own then you need to transfer the load back to something that has the capacity to carry it. Can you span beams between the under deck steel and rest your three columns on top of it? How far is that? Can you change the geometry so your columns line up with the deck steel and increase the size of the beams accordingly? If I was designing that support, I would start with the columns above the deck beams and build the vessel support level from there.

The tail is wagging the dog in your scenario. The only way I see to support this structure, as designed, is to put long beams, an inch or so clear of the deck, spanning from deck beam to deck beam. I assume it is a reinforced concrete deck. Are there any distributed loads on this deck? The only other way that I can think of is to analyze the deck for actual loading, using the point loads instead of the uniform load, but it has to be on a case by case basis using the actual load positions.

Why don't you turn the beams the other way and forget about the deck? The two green lines in the attached sketch represent two new beams just above the deck. Agree with BA. Easiest solution based on what you've provided. I agree, I think that everybody is on the right track.

I'll add one thing. If you are using the deck below your structure, you might find that these addtional beams may be an obstruction depending on length. You might need a skid, that is, with beams in both directions.

Add deck plate and a step if necessary, then you could place equipment or storage. Good luck. As per jsdpe to put in a skid, i agree with that.

So would need to calculate what load the skid say for example made up of 4 beams in longitudinal and transverse directions will put on the deck. I think that jsdpe means that the skid would span from deck beam to deck beam, as shown in BAretired's markup of your sketch, his suggestion is that if the beams are in the way, you might need a floordeck on the top of your skid, and possibly a step for access. This will probably be obvious but I have no idea of the proportions of the deck relative to the vessel and skid.

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Close Box. Students Click Here Join Us! Posting Guidelines Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden. B Hire a structural engineer you're going to get that comment anyway, might as well be me : RE: Points Loads to Distributed Loads A column reaction is a point load and should not be converted to an equivalent distributed load. The answer to your question is no.

Convert concentrated to uniform load

Convert concentrated to uniform load